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Why You Should Question Your Doctor

Your Doctor is Not God

Your Doctor is Not God

Are you struggling with chronic disease? For years, I suffered from terrible stomach pain, brain fog, muscle aches, and anxiety my doctor’s couldn’t put their finger on. Eventually, I was told that I needed psychiatric help and that my symptoms were “all in my head”.

I didn’t buy it. I didn’t care how many people told me I must love attention from doctors; I was bound and determined to find out what was wrong with me at any cost.

I didn’t care if I lost friends, disgusted co-workers, and confused family members. When conventional medicine couldn’t figure out what was wrong with me, I took to the Internet. The more I learned, the more connections I made and the more information I was armed with for my next visit to the doctor.

You can imagine my surprise when my theories and ideas were dismissed out of hand. I learned that men in white coats who’ve gone to school for over a decade are not interested in the opinion of a then-22-year-old woman who researches health information online.

After all, there’s a term for that now: Cyberchondriac.

Why You Should Question Your Doctor

Your doctor is not God. It doesn’t matter how many degrees are on his wall, what kind of car he drives or how long he has been in practice. You have every right to question your doctor.

In treating chronic disease, autoimmune conditions, and mystery symptoms, the conventional medical community often falls short. Allopathic medicine is designed to treat symptoms, not illness. Doctors are pressured by drug companies to push certain prescriptions and get kickbacks when they do.

You should question your doctor to find out if he actually cares about what you’re going through or if he’s just keeping up with the agenda. If he’s not listening to you or worse, making fun of you, it’s time to find somebody new.

You Are Your Own Best Advocate 

Ultimately, you’re the only one who can say what is right for you. If a certain drug is causing you side effects or a prescribed surgery just doesn’t seem right, you don’t have to do it just because your doctor said so.

In a medical community where doctors can only spend 5 or 10 minutes with you before moving on to the next patient, it is your sworn duty to research your own symptoms. It’s your job to take a look into how your diet, your environment, and your lifestyle could be contributing to your chronic illness.

Don’t let any medical professional tell you you’re crazy for taking charge of your health. The one and only reason a doctor would do that to you is because they feel threatened by your awareness. It takes money out of their pockets and makes them look like they don’t know what’s going on.

Natural Medicine Can Treat Chronic Disease

If you can’t find an open-minded conventional physician to understand what you’re going through, consider a visit with an osteopathic physician, a naturopathic physician, a homeopath, a chiropractor, a dietician, and/or an herbalist.

Conventional medicine can’t always treat chronic disease. Oftentimes, the only way to reverse or treat an autoimmune condition is through diet, supplements, lifestyle changes, and holistic treatments like acupuncture and massage therapy.

No matter who you are or how long you’ve been suffering with chronic disease, you are your own best advocate. You have the right to say what is done with and to your body. You have the right to stand up for yourself. At the end of the day, we are all human and we are all vulnerable, whether we have a college degree or not.

Don’t let you doctor intimidate you. If you can’t stand up to him, walk out, and find someone who really cares.

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